The Victorians could not get enough of stained glass and many of our older houses, loved and looked after over the years, still exhibit the masterful work of 19th Century glazers. The vibrant glass design is mainly found in the entrances and stairway windows of houses built during the Victorian and Edwardian period. The great revival was prompted by the arts and crafts movement with stained glass manufacture growing into an enormous and specialised industry. Today there are  novel ways of reproducing the Victorian look involving much less effort than our ancestors would have originally exerted. 

Current trends have seen stained glass appear in more unusual domestic settings, such as internal doors and windows, roof lights or even as part of a feature wall. When considering designs it's wise not to go for anything too personal - whimsical 19th century coats of arms aside, some designs may make your property less desirable if and when you come to sell. It's also worth thinking about the amount of light you will have if you choose to install stained glass. 

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If you haven't inherited the genuine Victorian article in your property you can get your local carpenter to do the heavy lifting. A good carpenter will know of a well stocked glass merchant where Victorian replica glass can be found. He can then take out the panels of a new door and replace with the glass. Ensure you get a least three quotes and a recommendation before settling on the ideal candidate. Ebay is full of reclaimed Victorian and Edwardian doors, so another great place to scout.

There is an easier way to achieve a stained glass look with simple yet convincing adhesives that add colour, interest and privacy.This is an example of a period stained glass effect by Purlfrost. Designs are printed on non frosted film for added vibrancy, or on frosted window film for privacy, using a UV resistant digital ink for durability. Sizes can be ordered to exact measurements and Purlfrost says that application is simple using soapy water and a squeegee.

 

 

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